In 1624, the Dutch people made the first settlement near the Hudson River, which led them to establish the New Amsterdam colony two years later, situated on Manhattan Island. The state was renamed New York by the British, who took over the control from the Dutch in 1664. During the American Revolution, New York played a pivotal role in the arena of strategy and politics, being a member of the original 13 colonies, the 11th to ratify the Constitution. Between the years of 1892 and 1954, New York received millions of immigrants, who became citizens of the United States of America after they passed through Ellis Island. That historic port of entry is estimated to be part of an ancestral background for up to 40 percent of American people. The state’s biggest city is New York City, which is called home by the New York Stock Exchange and a crucial economic hub in the world. The capital city of New York is Albany.

The state of New York has 62 counties, with twelve of them created by the British right after they took over New Amsterdam, the Dutch colony. Two of the original counties have been abolished. In 1914, the newest county was created from some annexed portions of New York City, and named Bronx County.

The judicial power of the state of New York is the Unified Court System that has been created to serve its population and to promote the laws of the state.

The highest court and also the court of last resort in New York is the Court of Appeals. It is composed of six associate justices and a chief judge. The justices hold a term of fourteen years and are appointed, with the senate’s consent, by the governor. The Court of Appeals chief justice is also the entire state’s administrative judge, aside from presiding over the Court of Appeals.

Jails

Public Records

Court Clerk

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